The Wildest Dream

Anyone who’s visited my site probably knows of my fascination with the disappearance of Mallory and Irvine on Everest in 1924.  I’d been watching the production of this film for a while and I luckily caught this the last night they were showing it in the theatre in St. Louis.

Being as familiar with the mystery as I am there wasn’t much history I wasn’t already aware of.  Most people watching this film, however, probably don’t have any background on Mallory and his three attempts to be the first to stand on the top of Mount Everest.  The film did a fine job of painting Mallory as the driven, talented, and conflicted person he was.  The film was part historical documentary, part cinematic re-enactment, and part modern-day replication.  It alternates between Mallory’s summit bids and Conrad Anker and Leo Holding’s summit attempt under the same conditions and (mostly) using the 1924 era equipment Mallory and Irvine used.

There are a number of theories as to exactly what happened on that day in 1924, as many of them include Mallory and Irvine reaching the summit as do not, and Anker also has his own opinions.  He’s convinced that Mallory survived the fall and placed his good leg over his bad leg, expiring shortly thereafter from exposure.  There are competing theories as to the actual cause of death (Mallory had a hole in his head which might have been caused by a kickback from his ice axe or an impact on a rock) and whether or not he was even conscious when he came to rest on the north face of Everest.  Anker is an experienced climber who’s summited Everest and, don’t forget, he found Mallory.  His opinion is as good or better than any.  Anker stops short of claiming he believes the pair successfully summited the mountain but he entertains that it’s definitely possible they had the ability to, given they retained their strength and frame of mind. Continue reading “The Wildest Dream”

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Gateway Cinephiles Review: The Road

I recently got up the guts to watch “The Road”, John Hillcoat’s faithful adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s horrific yet beautiful novel of the same name.  I wrote about the book some time back but instead of writing a review of the movie I thought I’d link to friend and film critic Andrew Wyatt’s apt review of the film.

Viggo Mortensen was incredible in this film, completely embodying the character from the book.  Kodi Smith-McPhee on the screen was exactly what I pictured The Boy to be.  Their performances, along with Hillcoat’s apparent intention to mimic the book very closely, made this film.

I very much liked the movie and, while not quite as good as the book, it was a faithful adaptation that effectively told this compelling story.  Don’t pass up this movie or the book because of the tough subject matter; it’ll leave you changed once you experience it.

You can read the review here: Gateway Cinephiles Review  » The Road

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